teenshealthandfitness:

beautifulpicturesofhealthyfood:

5 Minute Avocado Sorbet…RECIPE

Great healthy dessert for summer!

(via workout-shortie)

(Source: taintedcheeks, via florabones)

lustmachine asked: I'm going to cum to your pics.. <3

-_-

But guys, in 48 hours I’ll be in the fucking Caribbean

Me being slutty from a while back… More to come from today.

davegrohlio:

benjamin-cumberdash:

davegrohlio:

Is there anything more exciting than getting new bras and underwear

Having someone to take them off

You win this time

(Source: ebbievebber, via storming-s)

(Source: divinefitness, via queenkatiee)

lanallure:

Rebel Randall, 1946.

lanallure:

Rebel Randall, 1946.

(via joanx33)

keepmywhiskeyneat:

sexlibris:

For Gondor!

those are some cool boobs

(Source: e4rleb1rd, via lileddiesworld)

(Source: luxe-love, via perfectiontales)

Before John Green, his general category of realistic (non-fantasy) YA was rife with teen angst and “issues” fiction that you might have associated with the legendary Judy Blume, or with newer writers like Sarah Dessen or Laurie Halse Anderson. Anderson’s classic 1999 novel Speak, about a high schooler struggling to deal with the aftermath of sexual assault, was so influential that three years later Penguin launched an entire imprint named after it. One of the books launched under the behest of Speak was Green’s Looking for Alaska. But it’s Green whose name you’re more likely to know today, not Anderson’s, although Anderson has won more awards and written more books.

On Twitter, Green has 2 million followers. Compared to the rest of the leaders in Young Adult fiction, that number is staggering. To approach even half the Twitter influence of John Green all by himself, you need an entire army of YA women. Anderson, Blume, Dessen, Veronica Roth, Cassandra Clare, Richelle Mead, Margaret Stohl, Kami Garcia, Rainbow Rowell, Maureen Johnson, Malinda Lo, Holly Black, LJ Smith, Ellen Hopkins, Shannon Hale, Lauren Myracle, Libba Bray, Melissa Marr, and Leigh Bardugo: As a group these women only have about 1.2 million followers on Twitter. That’s the voice of one man outweighing several decades of women who have had major successes, critical acclaim, and cultural influence.